Frog Fungus Hammering Biodiversity of Communities

Sometimes to see something properly, you have to stand farther back. This is true of Chuck Close portraits where a patchwork of many small faces changes into one giant face as you back away.

CentralAmerica

It may also be true of the frogs of Central America, where the pattern of extinctions emerges clearly only at a certain spatial scale.

Everyone knows that frogs are in trouble and that some species have disappeared, but a recent analysis of Central American frog surveys shows the situation is worse than had been thought.

Under pressure from a fungal disease, the frogs in this biodiversity hot spot are undergoing “a vast homogenization” that is leaving behind impoverished communities that increasingly resemble one another.

We’re witnessing the McDonaldization of the frog communities,” says Kevin G. Smith, Ph.D., associate director of the Tyson Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis.

Read more: Washington University in St. Louis

Kirtland Peterson


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